Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Re-installing Win-10 in a dual-boot setup with Linux


This Linux Mint 17.3 desktop took a while to show you, because when I re-installed Windows 10, it quite naturally re-wrote the boot sector to make it a standard Windows type MBR. So that meant going on the web, and googling for a Linux Boot Repair Disk. And yes, there is one, and it's about 600 Mb, and once you burn the .iso to a disc, you're in business.

But I should mention that I got it using my other PC running another Linux O/S, and first of all, I needed a burning program for it, to make the disc from the .iso and the best one I found is called "K3b" and if you're already running a Linux system, you can install it using your regular package manager. Just go into your Terminal, using the command "sudo apt-get install K3b" and after you put in your password, a whole big download of stuff comes flying in. When that finishes, it's a good idea to stay in Terminal and do a "sudo apt-get update" to make sure that all those new additions are the latest versions. Then, you're "good to go".

Using that burning program K3b is even simpler than using "ImgBurn" in Windows, because all you have to do is find the file you want to burn, and then drag and drop it into the bottom window of the two in the program, and press "start". But first, don't forget to add the mark in the box for "Verify" so it will be verified before it completes the process. Then you're done.

Using the Boot Repair Disk is easy. Just make sure you're set to boot from removable media before you start, and then follow the directions. Your "F" keys will show you various sections of its help and instructions, beginning with "F1".
All I did was give it its head from a normal beginning, and in just three or four minutes, it had restored the original Linux dual-booting setup, like before the mung hit the fan the other day. All's well that ends well.


And just so you can see that I still do have the dual-booting working, here's my Windows desktop on this same PC. And I must say that I'm impressed with how nicely everything worked this morning in Linux. Just more proof that it is a really good system, and well thought out. When they say "It just works." they really mean it. And you should try it.


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