Friday, March 11, 2016

This is for Tom in New York ( and the rest of you )

Here's a map showing the distance between these two cities....


I'm a few more miles away, because our airport is on the south side of town, and I'm on the north side of town a few miles from it.....




These are pictures from a digital TV air signal coming from that city about sixty miles away. I haven't edited these to change anything but the size. They aren't perfect, but it's difficult to get great pictures of a movie or TV show because the images are changing quickly. However, I think this is fairly good reception for a very simple antenna. 

Digital TV isn't like analog, in that you won't get a 'snowy' picture from distant stations. You may get 'dropouts' like on a damaged DVD, but generally speaking you either get a perfect picture or none at all, and if you do get none at all, then try re-directing your antenna, just like we had to do with those outdoor antennas of years ago. But you don't need an antenna that covers the whole back yard. These are UHF signals with a short wave length, so an antenna with bars of two feet or less will do it nicely. I used to have the formula for calculating the length of bars for a given TV signal's frequency, but I lost that years ago, so these days, I'm just "winging it" and it still works, as you see.

Please Note:

If your TV was new in 2007 or more recently, then you won't need a digital converter box, but if it is older than 2007, then it won't have the built-in converter, and you would need to buy one. 

 

2 comments:

Tommy said...

Our big problem here Ray is there are mountains in the way. It look like you have a clean run over water, which is MUCH better for straight line communications.

Mountains and radio waves (high frequency) tend not to do well together. Believe me I've tried in past years...

Ray said...


I'm sorry to hear that, Tom.
I was hoping this might be helpful.
With the old-time TV signals, sometimes we could
get a bounce signal off something in another direction,
like a building or a rock face. Have you tried that?
I'm guessing you probably have.